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Thread: Turkish Village in Lebanon Akkar

  1. #1
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    Default Turkish Village in Lebanon Akkar

    The Turkish presence in Lebanon is barely known to the Turkish public.
    In order to fill this gap, and to get information about the Turks in Lebanon, ORSAM conducted a field study between June 10 and June 20 in Lebanon. Every Turkmen village and Turkish community in Lebanon was visited, and their authorities, prominent figures and villagers were interviewed.

    There are five Turkish communities in Lebanon. Each of these communities have a different history. These groups are: Akkar Turkmens living in two villages near Qoubaiyat in the Northern Province, The Baalbeck Turkmens living in five small settlements around the City of Baalbeck and one village near the city of Hermel in the Bekaa Province of Eastern Lebanon, the Cretan Turks who were brought to the lands under Ottoman control (Lebanon and Syria) when the island of Crete fell to Greece and attacks on the island’s Turks increased. They currently live in Tripoli, the Turkish citizens in Beirut, who migrated from the southeastern Turkey due to economic reasons and settled in Lebanon, particularly in Beirut, in the 1940s, and Syrian Turkmens who migrated from Syria to Lebanon and lastly the Circassians who settled in the Middle East after the Ottoman-Russian War between 1877 and 1878.

    As in every part of Lebanon, sectarianism is also extremely drastic among Turks in Lebanon. Therefore, their sectarian identity is more important to them than their ethnical identity. The dominant element of their identity is Sunni Islam. Although they are aware of their Turkmen identity, until recently they tended not to protect it, and their ethnic identity was eroded with each new generation. However, in recent years the idea of preserving Turkmen identity has come into prominence for certain reasons. These are the efforts of Turkish Embassy, Turkey’s increasing interest in Lebanon, Turkish troops coming to Southern Lebanon within the framework of UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon) and Turkishness being a source of pride for Turkmens in Lebanon.

    Religion and Sunni Islam are two of the main points of reference in social relations and in the political views of Turkmens in Lebanon. It can be said that they are conservative and devout, but they do not have radical tendencies. Turkmens are not exposed to any oppression or threat for being Turkmen, but they have some problems because of their being Sunni. Since they are Sunnis, they support Saad Hariri and his party, the Movement of the Future. In all the villages visited Hariri posters and the flags of the Movement of the Future were frequently seen.

    Thus Lebanon’s Turkmens’ relationship with Turkey is restricted to their ties with our Beirut Embassy and the Turkish military unit. Lebanese Turkmens visit the Turkish Embassy and the Turkish military unit frequently. In Turkmen villages many projects were completed, and some of them still continue thanks to the Embassy, the military unit and the Red Crescent society. Turkmens in Lebanon have been sympathetic to Turkey as Turkish interest in Turkmens has grown in recent years. There are some, who describe Turkey as their homeland.source http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/ne...f-lebanon.html

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    That's very interesting, maybe you could shed more light on this subject

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    do these Turkish people still speak Turkish or have they forgotten it.......would love to hear more about this

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    Turkey’s ambassador in Beirut, Serdar K?l?ç, has been assigned to the National Security Council’s (MGK) Secretariat-General. This means that K?l?ç, among the most successful figures in the Foreign Ministry, has in his first year of an expected four-year term at the Turkish Embassy in Beirut become the secretary-general of the MGK

    Born in 1958, K?l?ç is a diplomat with NATO experience. His appointment is also a continuation of the tradition of appointing diplomats with experience in Greece, Cyprus and the Middle East to the position.
    The MGK secretary-general position had been empty for a long time. Helmed by ambassadors from Aug. 17, 2004 to the present, the last person to serve in the spot -- Tahsin Burcuo?lu, who had also served as the Middle East manager in the Foreign Ministry -- left the post when he was appointed Turkey’s ambassador in Paris. Before Burcuo?lu, a former ambassador in Athens, assumed the post, it had been filled for the first time by a civilian when Ambassador Yi?it Alpogan -- who was also ambassador in Athens before becoming secretary-general -- was assigned. Discussions had been started over whether the MGK’s Secretariat-General -- the cerebrum of critical meetings that bring together the military with civilians and the institution that prepares national security policy documents -- could be sliding steadily from the Foreign Ministry toward the Ministry of the Interior. However, the expected developments did not take place. No local governor has been appointed MGK secretary-general.

    K?l?ç, who accompanied Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri on his visit to Turkey, met with Hariri and representatives of Hezbollah to enable the efficient evacuation of Turks during the 2008 clashes in Lebanon. K?l?ç’s success was praised by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdo?an in May 2008: “The ambassador in Beirut was able to conduct meetings during a very difficult period in which other ambassadors weren’t able to leave their homes due to armed clashes. He went to Hariri’s office. Hezbollah didn’t stop [K?l?ç]. He even explained how when he and Hariri were speaking, it was difficult to understand one another because of the sounds of gunfire coming from outside…” K?l?ç’s role during the period of clashes with Hezbollah in Lebanon was later upheld as a role model by Foreign Minister Ahmet Davuto?lu at an ambassadors’ conference.

    While taking the initiative in terms of both political and economic relations between Turkey and Lebanon, K?l?ç also helped increase awareness of ethnic Turks in Lebanon, a nation somewhat disconnected from both Turkey and the world at large. K?l?ç determined where Turkish villages in Lebanon were located and visited them, cementing ties between Lebanese Turkmens and Turkey. This ensured that the Turkmens of Lebanon would become a bridge of friendship between Turkey and Lebanon. It was also with K?l?ç’s encouragement that the Middle East Strategic Research Center (ORSAM) published a report entitled “The Forgotten Turks: Turkmens of Lebanon,” dated February 2010.

    As a result of K?l?ç’s efforts, the number of scholarships Turkey set aside for Lebanese Turkmens to study at Turkish universities was doubled from two to four. The construction of a school in the Turkish village of Kawashra was completed, as was a health clinic for use by Akkar Turkmens, with Foreign Minister Davuto?lu attending the inauguration. Turkish lessons are now being given to Akkar Turkmens and Cretan Turks living in Tripoli. A project to dig a well for drinking water in the Turkmen village of Aydamun, made possible by the Turkish Embassy, is ongoing; a Turkish language teacher is also giving lessons to the residents of Aydamun, and a school will soon be constructed there as well. K?l?ç became the first official from Turkey to visit the Baalbek Turkmens, and now the Turkish Embassy has completed the construction of a school in Duris for the Baalbek Turkmens and is working to build another in Addus. Work is ongoing for the establishment of Turkish cultural centers in Duris, Akkar and Beirut.

    The Lebanese people will not soon forget K?l?ç, who during his short time in Lebanon left considerable impressions in terms of friendship and fraternity. source http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/co...-turkmens.html

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    Interesting, have they committed a genocide in Lebanon too lately?

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    some of them not all mostly oldest still speak turkish. Turkey set aside for Lebanese Turkmens to study at Turkish universities was doubled from two to four. The construction of a school in the Turkish village of Kawashra was completed, as was a health clinic for use by Akkar Turkmens, with Foreign Minister Davuto?lu attending the inauguration. Turkish lessons are now being given to Akkar Turkmens and Cretan Turks living in Tripoli. A project to dig a well for drinking water in the Turkmen village of Aydamun, made possible by the Turkish Embassy, is ongoing; a Turkish language teacher is also giving lessons to the residents of Aydamun, and a school will soon be constructed there as well. K?l?ç became the first official from Turkey to visit the Baalbek Turkmens, and now the Turkish Embassy has completed the construction of a school in Duris for the Baalbek Turkmens and is working to build another in Addus. Work is ongoing for the establishment of Turkish cultural centers in Duris, Akkar and Beirut.

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