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Thread: Bint Jbeil Caza - Ain Ebel

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    Default Bint Jbeil Caza - Ain Ebel



    History of Ain Ebel

    The founders of Ain-Ebel chose a strategically located site along the ancient trade route that connected Tyre, Damascus and Haifa. The first inhabitants of Ain-Ebel were the Aramaics. According to historians, the name of the village derives from the names of two gods, Aon,the God of Fertility and Abel, the God of Creation, thus Aon-Abel, which by the passing of centuries and the change of languages that the region experienced was corrupted into Ain-Ebel.

    During Antiquity, another Canaanite God was worshipped in Ain-Ebel, Ashirat, the Mother of all Gods, and during the month of July, special festivities were held in Her honor on the southern hill of Ain-Ebel, that is today known as Shirta, an obvious derivation from Ashirat.Today, the tradition of worshipping a divine mother figure is still practiced in Ain-Ebel where the Virgin Mary is the patron saint of the village, and grand festivities are still held in the summer season in Her honor.

    Ain-Ebel was quickly converted to Christianity as it was situated on the apostolic route that the Apostles took as they went on their journeys of evangelism. Ain-Ebel prospered for centuries until the Mamlouks invaded the area to rid the region of the Crusaders, thus evacuating all the Christians who lived within 40 km of the coast in the triangle formed by Tyre, Acco, and Safad. Even though Ain-Ebel was not inhabited for two hundred years, its namesake survived. In 1602 Emir Fakhreddine took control over the Tyre and Safad regions, and he encouraged people from his area, Druze and Christians to expand with his increasing territory. Ain-Ebel was chosen again for resettlement because of its geographic location where it was not far from the main trade route, yet isolated enough to offer protection from greedy invaders. The abundance of springs and fertile land was another reason, and Ain-Ebel quickly became a center of olive, grape and fig production.

    The village lived peacefully and prospered without any major events effecting it until World War I when the Ottomans imposed compulsory military service for all men over the age of 18 and up to 45, which emptied the village of males, causing a lot of families to become poor.

    During this harsh period, many Ain-Ebelians with pioneering spirits immigrated to the Americas, especially Argentina to pursue happiness and freedom. Ain-Ebel was able to avoid being sucked into the 1860 civil war of Lebanon, but in 1920, Ain-Ebel and the surrounding villages fell into the Franco-British border conflict and their ploys to divide the Lebanese people. The British provoked the Muslims while the French incited the Christians. On May 5, 1920, neighboring villages attacked Ain-Ebel, and its inhabitants were expelled for two months. Upon their return two months later, the people of Ain-Ebel erected a monument in the honor of the Martyrs.

    The trade route that Ain-Ebel depended on was eliminated with the creation of the separate Palestinian (British) and Lebanese (French) markets, and later with the closing of the border after the creation of the state of Israel. Many Ain-Ebelians who worked and lived in Haifa were forced to leave their business and properties and return to Ain-Ebel as refugees. This created another wave of immigration, especially to Australia.

    The liberation in 2000 from the Israeli occupation provided the people of Ain-Ebel relief and hope for a prosperous and peaceful future. For half a century, Ain-Ebel has been caught in the middle of the crossfire of the Arab-Israeli conflict, and this was repeated again in 2006 when the village was evacuated due to the Israeli bombardment of the South. Yet through the persistence, patience and love of the people of Ain-Ebel, the village still stands and will continue to strive and grow. Despite all the difficulties, Ain-Ebel and its people hope, wish and pray for a chance to live in peace in the land of the Gospel.

    Historic facts provided by Charbel Barakat.

    Photographs provided by:

    Fadia Khreich Diab, (photographed by the late Fouad Nehm Diab), Ferris Khreich, (photographed by his uncle Father Joseph Khreich), and Diyaa and Bahaa Sader, (photographed by their father, Maroun Sader).


    Source:
    Ain-Ebel
    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    Cardinal Patriarch Antoine Khreich


    Biography from the Bkerke site:

    He was born in Ain-Ebel in the south of Lebanon in 1907. He had his primary studies at a school in the village and was sent to Rome to continue his philosophical and theological studies at the age of 13. He received his doctorate in philosophy at the age of 16 but due to an illness, returned to Lebanon, and continued his theological studies at the University of Saint Joseph in Beirut.

    Bishop Choukrallah Khoury ordained him priest at the Cathedral of Tyr on April 11th, 1930 where he began his priesthood life by teaching. He was appointed director of the Maronite seminary in Beirut La Sagesse. In 1936 Bishop Boulos MEOUCHI appointed him Vicariate General in Palestine and the President of the court of churches of that region. On 28th August 1950, Pope Pie XII designated him an honorary Bishop of Tarsous. Following this he became member of the commission of the Bishops of Vatican II, and member of the commission in charge of the statute of the clergy and the Christian people during the length of his council. At the end of the council, he became member of the Roman Curia for the suit of saints and remained there until his Patriarchate. In 1973, he became member of the new commission to revise the oriental cannon law and president of the legal commission of the APECL. Finally he became Patriarchal Curator and Assistant General to the patriarchal parish on 11th April 1974 with Bishop Nasrallah SFEIR. He was elected Patriarch on February 3rd, 1975. He was invested in his function as a Patriarch on Sunday 9th February, the day of the feast of St Maroun. He made official visits to Rome, Paris and the United States and attended the Synod of Bishops, which is held in Rome every three years.

    During his Patriarchate the blessed Charbel MAKHLOUF was declared Saint of the Universal church in an imposing ceremony at the Basilica St Pierre on 9th October 1977.

    During his Patriarchate sister Rafka, a Lebanese nun of Hamlaya, was also declared blessed at the Basilica St Pierre on 17th November 1985.

    He was the second Lebanese Patriarch to become Cardinal on the 2nd of February 1983. During his patriarchal period,the first worldwide Maronite Convention was held in Mexico in 1979 and the second in New York in 1980.

    He submitted his resignation as Patriarch to the Holy Father on 17th November 1985 at the age of 78 years.
    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    Photos:

















































    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    More photos:

























    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    Snow in Ain Ebel:









    Jean, the son of Antoine Farah poses for the camera.



    During the winter season, Ain-Ebel is very serene, especially when it snows which it usually does a couple of times a year. The following lovely photographs taken by Charbel Diab demonstrate the beauty of winter in Ain-Ebel.







    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    Christmas in Ain Ebel:

    In late November, around the time of Eid el Barbara (Saint Barbara's holiday), the Lebanese version of Halloween, Ain-Ebelians like most Lebanese plant seeds - chick peas, wheat grains, beans, lentils - in cotton wool. They water the seeds every day and by Christmas the seeds have shoots about 6 inches in height. People use the shoots to surround the manger in nativity scenes that is accompanied by the decorated Christmas tree.

    The children usually receive their gifts, hand delivered by Papa Noel, on Christmas Eve. Ain-Ebelians like to attend midnight mass to celebrate the birth of Christ. On Christmas morning relatives visit each other and are offered coffee, liqueurs and sugared almonds. Lunch at Christmas is the most important meal of the season. The meal traditionally consists of chicken and rice, and Kibb, a mixture of burghul (crushed wheat) and meat that is eaten with bread, olive oil and onions.



    A White Christmas in Ain-Ebel

    The Church during Christmas

    The Christmas Tree at the Church Square

    The Nativity Scene Outside the Church

    The 2000 Nativity Scene

    The 2000 Nativity Scene at Night

    Ain-Ebel Welcomes the New Millennium

    Christmas Lights near the Church Square

    Christmas Lights atop the Municipality Building

    Christmas Lights at the Mahfara Rond Point
    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    Easter in Ain Ebel:


    The Cross Procession on Good Friday

    The Cross Procession on Good Friday

    The Cross Procession on Good Friday

    The Church during Easter
    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

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    YOU CAN KILL A MAN BUT YOU CAN'T KILL AN IDEA. -Medgar Evers.

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    helwe hal day3a

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