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Thread: Keserwan and its villages

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    Default Keserwan and its villages

    Keserwan (Qadaa' Keserwèn) (Arabic ? ) is a district (qadaa) in the Mount Lebanon Governorate (Arabic: ), Lebanon, to the northeast of the Lebanon's capital Beirut. The capital is Jounieh.


    Origin of the name

    The name "Keserwan" comes from the from the Arabic word kesrah (Arabic ?) which means a little piece (as in a little piece of a crunchy or dried bread or a little piece of a broken rock) or the Arabic word kasar (Arabic ) which means to break. Some say it comes from the name of Kisra, a prince of the first Maronite inhabitants of Mount-Lebanon known as Mardaites. These ones may be Aramaic-speaking people of Persian origin. Following the Maronite tradition on their history Prince Kisr, at the head of the Mardaite Kingdom (VIIth century), visited the Byzantin Emperor whom granted him as state governor of Lebanon and congratulated him for his resistance against the Arabs. In return, Mardaite Lebanese people received him with great honor and called their own country Kisrawan after his name. Iranians called also many places of their country "Khosrovan" after the name of their Shah Khosro. So Keserwan is a typically Persian denomination made by authentic Lebanese inhabitants which shows the non-Arabic and Indo-European roots of Lebanon and his people.


    Keserwan streches over 342 Square Kilometers and starts from sea level on its coast to the heights of Mount Sannine at over 2600 meters of altitude.

    Cities, Towns, and Villages
    Keserwan has 67 villages/towns with 48 Municipalities. The total population of Keserwan is a bit over 200,000.

    Adma
    Ain Al Rihaneh
    Aintoura
    Ajaltoun
    Ashqout
    Aazra
    Bkerké
    Ballouneh
    Batha
    Bzomar
    Daraya
    Daroun
    Dlebta
    Faitroun
    Faraya
    Ghazir
    Ghebaleh
    Ghineh
    Ghosta
    Harissa
    Hrajel
    Jeita
    Jounieh
    Jouret Bedran
    Jouret el Termos
    Jwar El Hous
    Kaslik
    Kfardebian
    Kleiat
    Mayrouba
    Rayfoun
    Safra
    Sehaileh
    Tabarja
    Yahchouch
    Zouk Mikael
    Zouk Mosbeh

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    So Keserwan is a typically Persian denomination made by authentic Lebanese inhabitants which shows the non-Arabic and Indo-European roots of Lebanon and his people
    So first we were Semites, now we are Aryans. Nice move. Why this "authentic" and "non-Arabic" shit should be brought everywhere?
    It's just a name for God's sake. Then it may come from Arabic, as first stated, then Mardaites may be Aramaic-speaking people of Persian origin. Too much mays. And what's the source of the story of the Kisra-Byzantine emperor?
    And allow me to add, some say it comes from "Osroene", the name of the Aramaic kingdom of Edessa, which brings us back to we are all Aramaic.
    One must remember that in choosing the lesser of two evils, one still chooses evil - Hannah Arendt

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    1984,

    I noticed this too, it is from wikipedia, but I didn't have time to reply to it.. I will get more references about the name, none are conclusive but the one in wiki is the worst!!

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    Whenever it comes to Lebanese, Arabic, Islamic subjects, Wikipedia turns into a propaganda machine. Especially the biographies of their Majesties and Highnesses and Excellencies the rulers and sheikhs and dictators and their sons.
    One must remember that in choosing the lesser of two evils, one still chooses evil - Hannah Arendt

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