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Thread: Nasrallah Urges Calm, Says Hariri's Resignation 'Imposed' by Saudi

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    Default Nasrallah Urges Calm, Says Hariri's Resignation 'Imposed' by Saudi

    Nasrallah Urges Calm, Says Hariri's Resignation 'Imposed' by Saudi

    Hizbullah chief Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah said on Sunday that the previous day's shock resignation of Prime Minister Saad Hariri had been "imposed" by Saudi Arabia, urging calm in Lebanon at all levels.
    "It is clear that the resignation was a Saudi decision that was imposed on Prime Minister Hariri. It was not his intention, not his wish and not his decision," Nasrallah said in a televised address.
    Nasrallah accused Saudi Arabia of drafting Hariri's resignation letter and forcing him to read it on Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya TV. He even asked whether Hariri is being held against his will, referring to a purge of princes, ministers and businessmen in Saudi Arabia in an anti-corruption operation.
    “The speech that Hariri recited was written by a Saudi figure and it was not Hariri's usual rhetoric,” Nasrallah noted.
    “Why was not Hariri allowed to return to Lebanon to announce the resignation from here and not from Saudi Arabia?” he asked.
    “We were not hoping for this resignation and things were moving forward in a reasonable manner... We made a lot of achievements in the government and the government possessed the ability to survive until the upcoming parliamentary elections,” Nasrallah added.
    Turning to the wording of Hariri's resignation statement, Nasrallah said: “We will not comment on the content despite the statement's very harsh and dangerous language, because we believe that this text is a purely Saudi text.”
    Nasrallah also urged calm in connection with the fears that were sparked by Hariri's surprising resignation.
    “Everyone was surprised by the resignation, even al-Mustaqbal Movement's leadership, and this resignation has undoubtedly created an atmosphere of tension in Lebanon, especially with the threats and analyses that accompanied it,” Hizbullah's chief added.
    Hizbullah is “keen on Lebanon's security and civil peace” and “we call for calm,” he said.
    He noted that his meeting with the leaders of the Hizbullah-affiliated Resistance Brigades on Saturday had been scheduled prior to Hariri's resignation in order to mark 20 years since the foundation of the Brigades.
    “It had nothing to do with any development,” Nasrallah reassured.
    “We call for avoiding political escalation... seeing as escalation against us will not achieve anything but will rather reflect negatively on the country,” he said.
    “We call for avoiding a return to the previous tensions or to any street protests,” Nasrallah urged.
    Hizbullah's chief also downplayed the possibility of an external military attack on his group, dismissing rumors that were circulated following Hariri's resignation.
    “Israel does not work in the service of Saudi Arabia and an Israeli aggression would hinge on Israeli calculations... All Israelis have unanimously agreed since the July War that Israel will only go to war with Lebanon if the cost is low and victory is guaranteed,” Nasrallah said.
    “The resignation of our government has nothing to do with Israel's calculations,” he noted.
    Hariri announced his surprise resignation Saturday in a broadcast from the Saudi capital.
    He cited the "grip" of Hizbullah ally Iran on the country, and also said he feared for his life.
    Hariri, a two-time premier whose father Rafik held the same position for years and was assassinated in 2005, accused both Iran and Hizbullah of seeking hegemony in the region.
    The resignation sparked fears that Lebanon -- split into rivals camps led by Hariri and Hizbullah -- could once again descend into violence.
    Riyadh considers Hizbullah, a close ally of Saudi regional rival Iran, to be a "terrorist" organization.
    The two regional powers' tussle for influence has also played out in ongoing conflicts in Iraq, Syria and Yemen.
    It remains unclear who will succeed Hariri as prime minister in Lebanon.

    TIMELINE

    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: We call for avoiding a return to the previous tensions or to any street protests.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: We call for avoiding political escalation... seeing as escalation against us will not achieve anything but will rather reflect negatively on the country.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: My meeting with the Resistance Brigades yesterday had been scheduled prior to Hariri's resignation in order to mark 20 years since the foundation of the Brigades... and it had nothing to do with any development.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: Hizbullah is keen on Lebanon's security and civil peace and we call for calm.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah on wording of Hariri's resignation statement: We will not comment on the content despite the statement's very harsh and dangerous language, because we believe that this text is a purely Saudi text.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: We were not hoping for this resignation and things were moving forward in a reasonable manner... We made a lot of achievements in the government and the government possessed the ability to survive until the upcoming parliamentary elections.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: Everyone was surprised by the resignation, even al-Mustaqbal Movement's leadership, and this resignation has undoubtedly created an atmosphere of tension in Lebanon, especially with the threats and analyses that accompanied it.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: Why was not Hariri allowed to return to Lebanon to announce the resignation from here and not from Saudi Arabia?
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: The speech that Hariri recited was written by a Saudi figure and it was not Hariri's usual rhetoric.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: The resignation was a Saudi decision and Hariri was forced to resign.
    • 1 hour agoNasrallah: Hariri told ministers that Saudi Arabia promised to offer a lot of aid in addition to assistance to the army, and he was upbeat and relieved.
    • 1 hour agoHizbullah chief Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah in televised address on PM Hariri's resignation and the developments: Hariri told ministers that Saudi Arabia supports stability and security in Lebanon and the presence of the government.



    http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/2...posed-by-saudi
    "No need to say more...I, for one, do not care one iota about being politically correct, I do call it as I see it without no fear, and those who get their feeling hurt by such truth I say to them:
    " GO CRY ME A RIVER" "-Beirutilibnani


    The Right To Do Something Does Not Mean It Is Right. (William Safire)

    Every piece of this is man's bullshit. They call this war a cloud over the land. But they made the weather and then they stand in the rain and say 'Shit, it's raining!'

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    What Did Iran do that Forced the Lebanese Prime Minister to Resign?

    Political instability is a distinguishing feature of Lebanon. There has been no shortage of political assassinations and no shortage of short-lived governments, one after the other. Now, following this pattern, Prime Minister Saad Hariri announced on November 4 that he was resigningafter less than a year in office.
    But this time, it’s different. According to a number of Arab commentators, Hariri’s resignation was not another typical twist in Lebanese politics. Instead, some have described it as “a declaration of war against Iran.”
    In his televised resignation speech, delivered not from within Lebanon but from Saudi Arabia, Hariri said one of the reasons he was resigning was that he feared an assassination plot against him like the one that killed his father Rafik Hariri in 2005. "We are living in a climate similar to the atmosphere that prevailed before the assassination of martyr Rafik al-Hariri," he said from the Saudi capital Riyadh. He also directly attacked Iran. “I want to tell Iran and its followers that they are losing in their interferences in the affairs of Arab nations,” he said. “Our nation will rise just as it did before, and the hands that will harm it will be cut.” It was these comments that prompted some Arab analysts, including one from Al-Manar, the Hezbollah-affiliated television network, to describe his speech as “Saudi’s declaration of war against Iran.” Many people went on Twitter to say the same, according to BBC Arabic.
    Through Hezbollah, said Hariri, Iran has created “a state within a state” in Lebanon. He accused Iran of sowing “sedition, devastation and destruction” in any place it gets its hands on.
    The claim of an assassination plot has the potential to pressure Saudi Arabia into taking action to protect Hariri’s life. Saad Hariri was born and raised in Saudi Arabia and is a Saudi-Lebanese dual national, so the Saudi government would consider any threat against his life as a threat against a Saudi citizen. For Saudi Arabia, Saad Hariri has assumed the same role in Lebanon that Hassan Nasrallah, head of the Lebanese Hezbollah, plays for Iran.
    And he emphasized that he was talking not only about the Lebanese Hezbollah, but about all Iran’s allies, from Lebanon and Syria to Iraq, Bahrain and Yemen. This could be a signal that Saudi Arabia is preparing for a broader confrontation with Iran in Lebanon and, most likely, elsewhere.
    Saad Hariri had resigned once before, in 2011. At that time, he accused Hezbollah of sabotaging his government, but he did not attack Iran with such rancor, and he was not speaking from within Saudi Arabia.
    The timing of Hariri’s resignation is and speech is significant, coming one day after Ali Akbar Velayati, Ayatollah Khamenei’s senior advisor in international affairs, met with Hariri in Beirut. Did Velayati deliver a message to Hariri that led him to fear for his life so much he felt compelled to leave Lebanon and announce his resignation in Saudi Arabia to demonstrate that he had the support of the Saudis? What kind of menacing message could have made the prime minister feel he had no choice but to resign and to threaten to “cut the hands” of Iranian allies in the region?
    Since the Lebanese Hezbollah entered the Syrian civil war to support Bashar al-Assad, Saudi Arabia has responded by increasing its pressures to get rid of Assad in equal measures — and Hezbollah has borne the brunt of this pressure. With the sponsorship of Riyadh, four regional groupings — the Gulf Cooperation Council, the Arab League, the Arab Parliament and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation — have put Hezbollah on their list of terrorist groups.

    Hezbollah “Shining Like a Sun”
    The Saudi response in Syria enraged Ayatollah Khamenei in the extreme. “Hezbollah is showing its magnificent stature in the world of Islam,” he said in a speech on April 20, 2016. “Let us assume that such and such a dependent, corrupt, hollow and empty government [meaning Saudi Arabia] condemns Hezbollah in such and such a manifesto [by the Organization of Islamic Cooperation] and with its money and oil revenues. Well, the hell they do that! Who cares? Over there, Hezbollah is shining like a sun! Hezbollah is a source of pride for the world of Islam! The youth and members of Hezbollah of Lebanon are a source of pride for the world of Islam!”
    But, in December 2015, the United States Congress delivered a heavy blow to Hezbollah, passing a bill that named 100 entities and Hezbollah-associated groups and individuals on its sanctions list. The bill, the Hezbollah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, threatened sanctions against any bank in Lebanon, including its Central Bank, if it knowingly did business with entities that facilitate Hezbollah’s activities.
    This long list included high-level Hezbollah officials, including Hassan Nasrallah, two members of the Lebanese parliament and companies and institutions including Al-Manar television network, Al-Nour Radio and Al Rasoul Azam Hospital in Beirut. And in October 2017, the US State Department offered a total of $12 million for information leading to the arrest of Talal Hamiyah, head of Hezbollah’s foreign operations, and Fuad Shukr, a top Hezbollah military operative.
    The US clearly needs the government of Lebanon to enforce banking pressure on Hezbollah, and to hunt high-level Hezbollah operatives. And, more than anybody else, it is the job of the prime minister to carry out these actions. Refusing to cooperate with the US is not something Saad Hariri would contemplate because, first of all, he is an ally of Saudi Arabia and, second, he believes that his father was assassinated by Hezbollah.

    Turning the Table
    The message — or request — Velayati had for Hariri was likely to be a demand that he shield Hezbollah from such financial pressures. Fulfilling such a request would go against both Hariri's official duties as prime minister and his own beliefs and convictions. And he probably concluded that refusing this request put him in danger of meeting the same fate as his father. Perhaps he was also aware that his government would soon fall when his Hezbollah cabinet ministers resigned. So the only option left for him was to tender his own resignation. This way, US pressures and sanctions can go on unimpeded and, at the same time, he will be the one who, by dissolving his cabinet and delivering a fiery speech, would turn the table on Hezbollah and increase pressures on the group and its Iranian backers — instead of the other way around.
    Now that Hezbollah has been directly and publicly targeted by a force inside its own country, it is quite possible that predictions of new flare-ups in Lebanon and in the Middle East are not far off the mark.
    And at least the Islamic Republic tends to agree. "Hariri's resignation was done with planning by Donald Trump and Mohammed bin Salman, the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia," said Hussein Sheikh al-Islam, adviser to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on November 5. And Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi said Saad Hariri's departure was designed to create tensions in Lebanon and the region. He said that Hariri had repeated “unrealistic and unfounded accusations" and had aligned himself with "those who want ill for the region” — meaning Israel, Saudi Arabia and the US.

    https://iranwire.com/en/features/4952
    "No need to say more...I, for one, do not care one iota about being politically correct, I do call it as I see it without no fear, and those who get their feeling hurt by such truth I say to them:
    " GO CRY ME A RIVER" "-Beirutilibnani


    The Right To Do Something Does Not Mean It Is Right. (William Safire)

    Every piece of this is man's bullshit. They call this war a cloud over the land. But they made the weather and then they stand in the rain and say 'Shit, it's raining!'

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    Saad Hariri’s resignation as Prime Minister of Lebanon is not all it seems

    He certainly did not anticipate what happened to him. Indeed, Hariri had scheduled meetings in Beirut on the following Monday – with the IMF, the World Bank and a series of discussions on water quality improvement; not exactly the action of a man who planned to resign his premiership


    When Saad Hariri’s jet touched down at Riyadh on the evening of 3 November, the first thing he saw was a group of Saudi policemen surrounding the plane. When they came aboard, they confiscated his mobile phone and those of his bodyguards. Thus was Lebanon’s prime minister silenced.
    It was a dramatic moment in tune with the soap-box drama played out across Saudi Arabia this past week: the house arrest of 11 princes – including the immensely wealthy Alwaleed bin Talal – and four ministers and scores of other former government lackeys, not to mention the freezing of up to 1,700 bank accounts. Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman’s “Night of the Long Knives” did indeed begin at night, only hours after Hariri’s arrival in Riyadh. So what on earth is the crown prince up to?
    Put bluntly, he is clawing down all his rivals and – so the Lebanese fear – trying to destroy the government in Beirut, force the Shia Hezbollah out of the cabinet and restart a civil war in Lebanon. It won’t work, for the Lebanese – while not as rich – are a lot smarter than the Saudis. Every political group in the country, including Hezbollah, are demanding one thing only: Hariri must come back. As for Saudi Arabia, those who said that the Arab revolution will one day reach Riyadh – not with a minority Shia rising, but with a war inside the Sunni Wahhabi royal family – are watching the events of the past week with both shock and awe.
    World news in pictures













    But back to Hariri. On Friday 3 November, he was in a cabinet meeting in Beirut. Then he received a call, asking him to see King Salman of Saudi Arabia. Hariri, who like his assassinated father Rafiq, holds Saudi as well as Lebanese citizenship, set off at once. You do not turn down a king, even if you saw him a few days’ earlier, as Hariri had. And especially when the kingdom owes Hariri’s “Oger” company as much as $9bn, for such is the commonly rumoured state of affairs in what we now call “cash-strapped Saudi Arabia”.
    But more extraordinary matters were to come. Out of the blue and to the total shock of Lebanese ministers, Hariri, reading from a written text, announced on Saturday on the Arabia television channel – readers can guess which Gulf kingdom owns it – that he was resigning as prime minister of Lebanon. There were threats against his life, he said – though this was news to the security services in Beirut – and Hezbollah should be disarmed and wherever Iran interfered in the Middle East, there was chaos. Quite apart from the fact that Hezbollah cannot be disarmed without another civil war – is the Lebanese army supposed to attack them when Shia are the largest minority in the country (many of them in the army)? These were not words that Hariri had ever used before. They were not, in other words, written by him. As one who knows him well said this week, “this was not him speaking”. In other words, the Saudis had ordered the prime minister of Lebanon to resign and to read his own departure out loud from Riyadh.
    I should add, of course, that Hariri’s wife and family are in Riyadh, so even if he did return to Beirut, there would be hostages left behind. Thus after a week of this outrageous political farce, there is even talk in Beirut of asking Saad Hariri’s elder brother Bahaa to take his seat in the cabinet. But what of Saad himself? Callers have reached him at his Riyadh home, but he speaks only a few words. “He says ‘I will come back’ or ‘I’m fine’, that’s all, only those words, which is very unlike him,” says one who must know. And what if Hariri did come back? Would he claim that his resignation had been forced upon him? Dare the Saudis risk this?









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    Saudi Arabia's crown prince: Country will return to 'moderate, open Islam'

    He certainly did not anticipate what happened to him. Indeed, Hariri had scheduled meetings in Beirut on the following Monday – with the IMF, the World Bank and a series of discussions on water quality improvement; not exactly the action of a man who planned to resign his premiership. However, the words he read out – scripted for him – are entirely in line with the speeches of Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman and with the insane President of the United States who speaks of Iran with the same anger, as does the American Defence Secretary.
    Of course, the real story is just what is going on in Saudi Arabia itself, for the crown prince has broken forever the great compromise that exists in the kingdom: between the royal family and the clergy, and between the tribes. This was always the bedrock upon which the country stood or fell. And Mohamed bin Salman has now broken this apart. He is liquidating his enemies – the arrests, needless to say, are supposedly part of an “anti-corruption drive”, a device which Arab dictators have always used when destroying their political opponents.
    READ MORE




    There will be no complaints from Washington or London, whose desire to share in the divvying up of Saudi Aramco (another of the crown prince’s projects) will smother any thoughts of protest or warning. And given the smarmy reporting of the Crown Prince’s recent speeches in the New York Times, I have my suspicions that even this elderly journalistic organ will be comparatively unworried by the Saudi coup d’etat. For that is what it is. He unseated the interior minister earlier this year and now Mohamed bin Salman is getting rid of his opponents’ financial power.
    But ruthless men can also be humble. Hariri was allowed to see the King – the original reason for which he believed he was travelling to Riyadh – and even paid a visit to the crown prince of the United Arab Emirates this week, an ally-nation of the Saudis who would prevent him jumping on a flight to Beirut. But why on earth would Hariri want to go to the Emirates? To prove that he was still free to travel when he cannot even return to the country which he is supposed to be ruling?
    Lebanon is always going through the greatest crisis since its last greatest crisis. But this time, it’s for real.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...-a8045636.html
    "No need to say more...I, for one, do not care one iota about being politically correct, I do call it as I see it without no fear, and those who get their feeling hurt by such truth I say to them:
    " GO CRY ME A RIVER" "-Beirutilibnani


    The Right To Do Something Does Not Mean It Is Right. (William Safire)

    Every piece of this is man's bullshit. They call this war a cloud over the land. But they made the weather and then they stand in the rain and say 'Shit, it's raining!'

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