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Thread: Learning Hebrew

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    Default Learning Hebrew

    I had a bad experience in learning Hebrew language due to my European Ashkenazi teacher who was unable to pronounce pure semitic letters like 3ayen , 7et, Quph , Ttet , Ssad and Resh so I left the class after two days of starting because I became her teacher and showed her how to utter semitic letters !!
    For example she reads the word Qarob as Kaghov !!.... ( she killed the word and cut its semetic Arteries )
    Have any one of you had a bad experience in learning foreign language ?

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    Pretty much I hate the way they teach Spanish.

    The books translate: Me gusta naranjas as "I like oranges," when it actually means "Oranges please me."

    La lo doy a ella is translated as "I give it to her," when it really means [to] Her it (I) give to her, with the (to) and (I) unstated but understood.

    Google translate confuses gender and indirect objects.

    The problem is that they never teach you how to think in other languages. They teach the language as if it was merely word and grammar replacement. Languages are not word replacement but completely different mental universes.

    Las Latinas can be translated as "The Latin ladies," when it really means The Latin (whatever), with ladies being understood from context and adjective declension for gender.

    Spanish has very common and often used subjunctive verb structures which are very weak, and rarely used, in English. This means the Spanish have a clearer comprehension of possibility and probability than we Americans. Their verbs are more precise.

    But we Americans have more nouns and adjectives, which are more specific. The Spanish have flaco (thin) and esbelto (svelte). We have thin, slim, skinny, and svelte, and with more shades of understanding which the Spanish do not have.

    So we rely on adjectives and nouns, while the Spanish can rely on verbs.

    That is my problem.

    I always point this out to monolingual people, the simple American word: Thanksgiving requires a paragraph to explain in other languages.

    As for Arabic and Hebrew: My understanding is that Arabic has a more complex verb structure, probably obtained from trading and migrations, whereas Hebrew is more centered and less complex.

    They are not butchering semitic consonants, but merely putting their spin on them.

    It is common that words which end in d or dt in German often end in t in English.

    Stadt become State (with a silent e) in English.

    This is just language evolution, and the Grimm Brothers figurered it out wit their Grimm's law of language evolution for Indo-European languages. This is how they can track back to ancient languages. These laws are - believe it or not - quite common.

    The Sh sound in Hebrew is s in Arabic. Shalom becomes Salaam.

    Likewise, in German it was pronounced Ein(sh)tein, but in English Einstein. The German sh often became an s in English.

    Not butchering but merely evolution.
    Last edited by CuriousAmerican; 12-10-2015 at 05:08 AM.

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    Great , I think we both share common interest which is learning and understanding languages .
    Yes Arabic to Hebrew like German to English as all of them share common roots and have many similarities like what you mentioned in your comment e.g the word Near in Arabic QaRiB and in Hebrew QaRoB the root is QRB or No in Ar. is La = in Heb. is Lo or the word self in Ar. is Nefes = in Heb. is Nefesh .
    in German Trink and in English Drink most of the times the letter T in English transform to SS in German like Great = Gross or Water = Wasser or Street = Strasse .

    Likewise, in German it was pronounced Ein(sh)tein, but in English Einstein. The German sh often became an s in English.
    Sorry to say here you are wrong because Einstein is a german name and has a meaning with some rules in case of spelling it in german as the letter S converts to SH sound when it comes before the letters T and P like Spiegel ( SHpiegel ) and Stern ( SHtern ) so Einstein ( EinSHtein ) .

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    Quote Originally Posted by jolio View Post
    Great , I think we both share common interest which is learning and understanding languages .
    Yes Arabic to Hebrew like German to English as all of them share common roots and have many similarities like what you mentioned in your comment e.g the word Near in Arabic QaRiB and in Hebrew QaRoB the root is QRB or No in Ar. is La = in Heb. is Lo or the word self in Ar. is Nefes = in Heb. is Nefesh .
    in German Trink and in English Drink most of the times the letter T in English transform to SS in German like Great = Gross or Water = Wasser or Street = Strasse .


    Sorry to say here you are wrong because Einstein is a german name and has a meaning with some rules in case of spelling it in german as the letter S converts to SH sound when it comes before the letters T and P like Spiegel ( SHpiegel ) and Stern ( SHtern ) so Einstein ( EinSHtein ) .

    That is what I said. Though I may not have properly defined the mechanism.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jolio View Post
    I had a bad experience in learning Hebrew language due to my European Ashkenazi teacher who was unable to pronounce pure semitic letters like 3ayen , 7et, Quph , Ttet , Ssad and Resh so I left the class after two days of starting because I became her teacher and showed her how to utter semitic letters !!
    For example she reads the word Qarob as Kaghov !!.... ( she killed the word and cut its semetic Arteries )
    Have any one of you had a bad experience in learning foreign language ?
    Who would claim to be that, who was not.

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    hey jolio

    suck on my halal meat

    ty
    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." --Oscar Wilde

  7. Thanks Samaritan thanked for this post
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    Samaritan : This smells like Bullshit !
    janoubi : suck on my halal meat .

    Could you please do a favor and explain to us what are the connections between your comments and the Thread ?!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CuriousAmerican View Post
    That is what I said. Though I may not have properly defined the mechanism.
    Moreover I have found that German has a great influence on modern Hebrew as it borrowed many words like Auto for car and Universitaet for University plus letters sound like german Z ( TS ) and R ( GH ) so we can call the modern Hebrew as half Aryan and half Semitic language or Semi Semitic !

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    Quote Originally Posted by jolio View Post
    Moreover I have found that German has a great influence on modern Hebrew as it borrowed many words like Auto for car and Universitaet for University plus letters sound like german Z ( TS ) and R ( GH ) so we can call the modern Hebrew as half Aryan and half Semitic language or Semi Semitic !
    I would not go that far.

    English is technically a Germanic language, with a root that comes from Platte Deutsch (a north German dialect). However, when the Normans invaded England, they brought so much French with them that English became a Germanic-Latin hybrid, which is why to English speakers both German and French/Spanish seem foreign.

    milk - Milch German

    house - Haus German

    school - Schule German

    but

    education - ├ęducation - French/ A latin language

    medical - m├ędical - French / A latin language

    Similar process probably occurred in Hebrew, but that does not make Hebrew non-Semitic. Arabic probably picked up a lot of sounds from Persian and Amerzigh/Berber dialects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by janoubi View Post
    hey jolio

    suck on my halal meat

    ty
    Y'know, I disagree with jolio, too; but was that necessary. Some people here just go looking for fights.

    Jolio is off-the-wall in some of his beliefs, but he can be friendly.

    Does jolio want Israel to cease to exist? Yes, and I totally disagree with Jolio on that opinion.

    But

    You, and other here, want to crush Palestinian nationality, with some denying Palestine identity even exists. That is as just as offensive to jolio as his opinions are to you.

    Some here have no sense of humor.

    Jolio can be wacky, but he can be interesting, too.

    There is one difference though. He sees you has human; while you do not see him as human.

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