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Thread: Butrus Khawand & The Detainees in Syrian Jails

  1. #111
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  2. #112
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    Syria War Deepens Fears for Lebanon's Missing

    For 22 years, Mary Mansourati has been waiting for her son, Dani, to come home. His shirts are ironed and hanging in his closet. His trousers, neatly folded, are stacked on the shelves next to his bed in the family's Beirut apartment.
    Dani was 30 when he was detained by Syrian intelligence and has not been heard from since. He is among an estimated 17,000 Lebanese still missing from Lebanon's civil war or the years of Syrian domination that followed.
    The war in Syria has added new urgency to the plight of their families. Hundreds of Lebanese were detained by the Syrians, and their relatives are convinced they are still alive. Now they fear they will be lost in Syria's labyrinth of overcrowded jails and detention facilities or be killed in the ongoing mayhem.
    The war in Syria has also added a new generation of names to the already long rolls of the missing. There are no exact figures, but human rights organizations say tens of thousands of Syrians have vanished in the three years since the uprising against President Bashar Assad began.
    Elsewhere in the region, nearly 70,000 Iraqis are still missing from three wars over the past three decades, including sectarian bloodletting that was unleashed by the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, according to government figures.
    There's never been any truth or reconciliation process that might uncover the fates of these missing. In both Lebanon and Iraq, few efforts have been made to examine what happened during the countries' wars, mainly because many of those involved in killings and kidnappings have become politicians, some even serving in government.
    The 82-year-old Mansourati believes her son is alive in a Syrian prison, despite having no concrete evidence or word that anyone has seen him. A fighter with an anti-Syrian Christian militia, he was arrested in 1992, two years after the civil war ended.
    "We need our sons back," she told The Associated Press in an interview at her home in east Beirut, where she cares for her gravely ill husband.
    Friday marked the ninth anniversary of a permanent protest tent Mansourati and other families of the missing have erected in downtown Beirut. Every day, relatives sit at the tent, sometimes spending the night. Photos of the missing and slogans calling on Assad to explain their fate line the sides of the tent.
    "We are tired of going back and forth to the tent. We are getting old," Mansourati said.
    Like many relatives of the missing, she believes Lebanese officials, some of whom led militias during the civil war and fought on behest of the Syrians, are complicit in covering up their loved ones' fates.
    Rights groups speak of a "conspiracy of silence," with officials withholding information out of concern they could be implicated in wartime atrocities.
    The Taif Accord ended the war in 1990 by enshrining a sectarian-based political system that leaves all major decisions in the hands of a small group of people, many of whom gained political power by commanding a powerful militia during the conflict.
    There has been no serious state-led documentation that would produce an official record with the numbers of dead, injured, missing and forcibly displaced. Lebanon went into "collective amnesia" after the war, the International Center for Transitional Justice said in a recent report documenting the country's failure to examine and deal with its complex past.
    A year after the Lebanese civil war ended, the government declared there were no detainees being held by rival militias. Four years later, in 1995, the government passed a law declaring any person missing for more than four years legally dead, advising families looking for their vanished loved ones to move on.
    Most of the thousands missing likely are dead. They disappeared after being kidnapped by rival Lebanese militias during the war, which saw multiple sectarian massacres, and there's little chance any Lebanese faction could keep someone secretly detained for nearly a quarter century. Still, even uncovering suspected locations of mass graves where the missing might be is considered too politically explosive.
    When the families persisted in demanding the truth, the government said it couldn't help because digging too deep into the past could inflame old hostilities and unleash another war.
    "The official discourse was, if peace is to prevail we need to forget the past and move on into the future," said Lebanese lawyer Nizar Saghieh, who has represented hundreds of families seeking to discover the fate of their missing relatives.
    But the families of those who disappeared after being detained by Syria are far less convinced by the government's death declaration. Rights groups estimate they number between 300 and 600 Lebanese.
    Majida Hassan Bashasha's brother, Ahmed, was picked up by Syrian troops at a checkpoint near Beirut in 1976, the year Syrian forces entered Lebanon to help quell the sectarian fighting. Ahmed was 18 when he vanished, and his sister says he was not a militant.
    Like Mary Mansourati, 59-year-old Bashasha believes her brother is alive, languishing in a Syrian prison. She has been campaigning relentlessly to bring him home, attending annual rallies of the families of the disappeared in front of the local U.N. headquarters in Beirut. A few years ago, several former detainees came to the protest tent and recognized her brother from a picture she was holding. They said they shared a cell with him in a Damascus prison.
    "I am his big sister and my heart tells me he is still alive," Bashasha said, holding a black-and-white photo of a young man she said was Ahmed.
    Initially, when the conflict started in Syria she feared that her brother and other Lebanese detainees would be forgotten. But now, as she watches Assad's agents fill Syria's prisons with a new generation of government opponents, she holds out some hope that any Lebanese being held in Syria will be released.
    "They don't need them in prison anymore," Bashasha said.

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    Report: Fate of Seven Lebanese Missing in Syria May Be Resolved Soon

    The Lebanese government and the Qatari capital Doha are exerting efforts with some factions of the armed Syrian opposition to release some Lebanese who have gone missing in the neighboring country, reported As Safir newspaper on Saturday.
    A widely-informed security source told the daily that the contacts will likely result in the release of around seven Lebanese held in Syria after it emerged that they may still be alive.
    The details of how they went missing were not revealed.
    In a related matter, As Safir said that efforts to release the two kidnapped bishops in Syria have not stopped.
    The source explained that a breakthrough in the issue has been hard to reach because whenever it seems like they may be released by their captives, the bishops are handed over to a new armed Syrian group, consequently eliminating all efforts that have been made.
    The issue is revolving in a vicious cycle, added the security source.
    The two bishops, Yohanna Ibrahim and Boulos Yaziji, were kidnapped on April 23, 2013, reportedly near the rebel-held town of Kafr Dael, near Aleppo in northern Syria.
    They were in Syria on humanitarian work.

    http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/1...-resolved-soon

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    بالصور: جعجع استقبل جمعية المعتقلين اللبنانيين في السجون السورية

    استقبل رئيس حزب “القوات اللبنانية” الدكتور سمير جعجع رئيس جمعية المعتقلين اللبنانيين في السجون السورية علي ابو دهن على رأس وفد.
    بعد اللقاء، قال ابو الدهن:” رغم الأزمة المأساوية الذي يشهدها لبنان، إلا أن قضية المعتقلين اللبنانين في السجون السورية لا زالت تُستنزف، وقد جئنا لدى الدكتور جعجع الذي يدعم هذه القضية ووضعنا بين يديه هذا الملف الذي لن ينساه ولا يتناساه أبداً، بحيث شرح لنا ان البلد يحتاج الى انتخاب رئيس للجمهورية ليُصدر قراراً بالتعويضات النائمة في ادراج لجنة المال والموازنة والمتوجبة تجاه هؤلاء المعتقلين، كما يجب أن يكون المجلس النيابي فاعلاً في هذا الشأن، وقد وعدنا جعجع خيراً بإنهاء قضيتنا”.
    (تصوير ألدو أيوب)
    واذ قدم ابو الدهن كتاباً جديداً بعنوان: “المعتقلون اللبنانيون في السجون السورية: خارجون من القبور” للدكتور جعجع الذي يوثق روايات كل الخارجين من المعتقلات السورية، أمل من الجميع قراءة هذا الكتاب للاطلاع على العذابات التي عاناها المعتقلون في السجون وعذابات أهاليهم الذين ما زالوا في خيمة الاعتصام أمام الاسكوا.

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    وحشية تعذيب تفوق الخيال… لن تجدوها إلا في سجون الأسد!

    يصف معتقلون سابقون لدى النظام السوري “عالما آخر” منفصلا عن العالم الواقعي يقبع فيه نزلاء السجون الذين يتعرضون يوميا لاساليب تعذيب مبتكرة، من الضرب المبرح والصعق بالكهرباء والتجويع أو تقديم طعام ممزوج بالذل والقمامة… “كابوس” يصعب عليهم نسيانه.
    ويقول الناشط محسن المصري الذي كان يعمل قبل النزاع في الهندسة المعلوماتية، انه جرى نقله خلال سنتين بين سجون عدة عانى فيها الامرّين: ضرب، وتعليق بالسقف من المعصمين لساعات، واجباره على البقاء عاريا اياما وسط برد الشتاء القارس.
    ومن أسوأ ما تعرض له، يروي لوكالة “فرانس برس” عبر الانترنت “ذات يوم، أخرجونا الى الممرات لرش مبيدات للحشرات داخل الزنزانات. وبسبب بخ المبيدات، صارت الصراصير تخرج الى الممرات وتطلع على وجوهنا، ونحن اعيننا معصوبة وايدينا مقيدة وراء ظهورنا. حملوا الصراصير ووضعوها داخل ملابسنا، ثم بخوا مبيدات علينا”.
    ومحسن المصري، واسمه مستعار، واحد من حوالي مئتي الف معتقل سجنتهم السلطات منذ بدء النزاع في منتصف آذار 2011، بسبب انشطتهم المناهضة لنظام الرئيس بشار الاسد.
    ويقول ناشط من دمشق يقدم نفسه باسم محمد سمعان (33 عاما)، “لا شيء مما قرأته او سمعته عن روايات الشعوب الاخرى كان في امكانه ان يحضرني لتجربة الاعتقال الرهيبة التي مررت بها”، مضيفا “اكتشفت ان هناك عالما آخر مرعبا موجودا في سوريا”.
    وكان سمعان يتحدث بهدوء، وهو ينفث من سيجارة ويتذكر. “سجنت مرتين بسبب نشاطي ضد نظام الاسد، المرة الاولى لتسعة اشهر، والمرة الثانية لاربعة اشهر. وفي المرتين، تعرضت لاسوأ انواع التعذيب النفسي والجسدي”.
    قال له مرة احد المحققين في فرع امني في دمشق “نحن لا نعذبكم بسبب نشاطكم ضد النظام. انتم لا تؤثرون علينا، انما نعذبكم لاننا نتلذذ بتعذيب الناس”.
    ويشير سمعان الى انه تعرض للصعق بالتيار الكهربائي. “ثم طلب مني المحقق ان أكتب كل ما أعرف” عن نشاط المعارضين، و”لم أشعر بالرعب مرة كما شعرت في ذلك الوقت. فعل كل شيء لتحطيمي”.
    من جهته، يروي المصري باسهاب عن تفاصيل تبقى محفورة في ذاكرته.
    تم توقيفه على الحدود بينما كان يحاول العبور الى لبنان المجاور. وسلم الى فرع الامن العسكري في دمشق حيث كان المحققون “يشتمون زوجتي ويهددون باعتقالها واغتصابها”. بين جولة تحقيق واخرى، “كانوا يوقفونني عاريا في الخارج، ثم يدخلونني ويطرحون الاسئلة وهم ينهالون علي ضربا”.
    بقي في الفرع سبعة اشهر، وكان المكان الذي ينام فيه “مساحته 36 مترا مربعا، ويضم خمسين شخصا في البداية، ثم اصبحوا مئة”.
    ويشير سوري ناشط في مجال الدفاع عن حقوق الانسان رافضا الكشف عن هويته الى وجود اكثر من مئة سجن ومركز اعتقال في انحاء البلاد، بينها سجنا عدرا وصيدنايا قرب دمشق اللذان مر فيهما كل من المصري وسمعان.

    ويتحدث عن شبكة من السجون السورية والفروع الامنية ومراكز الاعتقال السرية التي يصفها بـ”الكابوس”، بينها “ثلاثون الى اربعين فرعا امنيا غير قانونية” بمعنى انها غير مخولة ابقاء معتقلين لديها، “بالاضافة الى عدد غير محدد من مراكز الاعتقال السرية”.
    ويضيف الناشط “هناك اربعة اجهزة امنية في سوريا، وكل منها يبذل اقصى جهده ليثبت انه اكثر عنفا من الاجهزة الاخرى”.
    ويمنع المحامون من مقابلة موكليهم، كما يمنعون من المثول امام المحاكم الميدانية، ما يحرم المعتقل من ادنى مقومات الدفاع المشروع عن النفس.
    دخل المصري السجن وكان وزنه اكثر من مئة كلغ، وخرج منه وهو يزن اقل من خمسين كلغ.
    بدأ النزاع في سوريا بحركة احتجاجية سلمية، وظل الناشطون ينظمون تظاهرات تطالب باسقاط النظام لاشهر طويلة ويواجهون بالقمع والسجن واطلاق النار. تدريجيا تحول النزاع عسكريا. ويقول الناشطون ان معظم الذين قادوا حركة الاحتجاج هم في السجن او مفقودون، او قتلوا او هاجروا.
    اما الذين تمكنوا من الخروج من السجن، فهم في صراع يومي مع الذكريات الموجعة.
    ويقول سمعان “الذكريات تسكنني وتطاردني كل يوم، عندما آكل، عندما أنام… الوضع غاية في القبح هناك. بعض الامور لا يمكنني حتى التكلم عنها”.

  6. #116
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    https://now.mmedia.me/lb/en/NewsRepo...eed-in-palmyra

    http://mtv.com.lb/EN/News/480942

    http://www.lbcgroup.tv/news/215175/i...f-alleged-rele

    Reports emerged earlier via Twitter stating that the Islamic State had freed 27 Lebanese nationals from Syria's notorious government-run Tadmor prison, including 5 Christians who have been detained for over 35 years.


    River to Sea

  7. #117
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    There were reports about this but nothing yet for sure. If true they need to return to Leb at once. Big celebrations should be held throughout.

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